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Lord of the Flies - Full Text Analysis

By William Golding

Plot Overview

Lord of the Flies follows a group of British schoolboys who are stranded on a deserted island in the Pacific Ocean during an unspecified war. The novel begins with the boys' plane crash-landing on the island, killing all the adult passengers and leaving the boys alone and stranded.

The boys, initially excited at the prospect of being alone on an uninhabited island, begin to establish their own society and rules, with Ralph elected as the leader. However, soon a struggle for power emerges between Ralph and Jack, who represents the primal instinct of savagery and violence. As the novel progresses, the boys descend into chaos and brutality, losing their sense of civility and becoming increasingly violent and aggressive.

The group's attempt to maintain order is complicated by the arrival of a "beast" on the island, which they initially believe is a creature they need to kill in order to survive. This "beast" is later revealed to be a dead parachutist, but the boys' fear and hysteria causes them to believe that it is a monster. Simon, one of the more introspective and spiritual boys, discovers the truth about the "beast," but is tragically killed by the other boys in a frenzied state of fear and confusion.

As the boys become more violent and unstable, their society begins to crumble. Piggy, a rational and intelligent boy, is killed by Roger, one of Jack's followers, using a boulder. The final confrontation between Ralph and Jack's factions results in the death of many of the boys, including Piggy, Simon, and the boy with the mulberry birthmark.

The novel ends with the arrival of a naval officer, who rescues the boys just as they are about to be killed by Jack's tribe. The officer is shocked at the savagery he sees on the island, but Ralph, who has witnessed the loss of his innocence and the breakdown of society, weeps at the knowledge of what the boys have become.

Throughout the novel, Golding explores the theme of the inherent darkness in human nature, and the ways in which our primal instincts can lead us to violence and chaos. The boys' descent into savagery and the breakdown of their society serves as a commentary on the dangers of authoritarianism and the importance of social order and democracy. Ultimately, Lord of the Flies is a powerful warning against the dangers of unchecked power and the need for moral responsibility in human society.

Plot Overview

Context and Purpose

Lord of the Flies was published in 1954, in the aftermath of World War II and at the height of the Cold War. Written by British author William Golding, the novel is set on an uninhabited island, where a group of young boys are stranded after a plane crash. Through the novel, Golding explores the darker side of human nature and the capacity for violence within individuals and societies.

The novel can be read as a commentary on the state of the world in the mid-20th century, particularly the aftermath of World War II and the rise of nuclear weapons. The boys' descent into savagery can be seen as a reflection of the fear and chaos that gripped the world during this time. Golding also draws on his own experiences as a schoolteacher, which informed his views on the inherent nature of humanity.

The novel's portrayal of the breakdown of society and the emergence of authoritarianism can be linked to the rise of fascist and totalitarian regimes during World War II. The character of Jack, who becomes increasingly tyrannical as the novel progresses, can be seen as a representation of the dictators of the time, such as Hitler and Stalin. The boys' eventual rescue can be interpreted as a symbol of the hope for a return to order and stability in the post-war world.

The novel also explores the theme of the loss of innocence and the corrupting influence of power. The boys' initial attempts to establish a democratic society are quickly undermined by the lure of power and the desire for control. The character of Simon, who represents a Christ-like figure, embodies the idea of innocence and goodness, but is ultimately destroyed by the savagery of the others.

In addition to its historical and social context, Lord of the Flies is also influenced by Golding's personal beliefs and experiences. Golding was a firm believer in the idea of original sin, which holds that all humans are inherently sinful and capable of evil. This belief is reflected in the novel's exploration of the darker side of human nature and the idea that the boys' savagery is a manifestation of their innate brutality.

Overall, Lord of the Flies is a powerful commentary on the human condition and the potential for violence within all of us. Through its exploration of the breakdown of society and the loss of innocence, the novel speaks to the anxieties of its time and remains relevant today.

Context and Purpose

Critical Author Information

William Golding was born on September 19, 1911, in Cornwall, England. His father was a schoolteacher and his mother was an active suffragette who fought for women's rights. Golding was educated at Marlborough Grammar School and then went on to study English literature at Brasenose College, Oxford. He served in the Royal Navy during World War II and was present at the Normandy landings. His experiences during the war, including the horrors he witnessed, greatly influenced his writing.

Golding began writing in the late 1940s and published his first novel, "Lord of the Flies," in 1954. The novel was inspired by his experiences during the war and his belief that human nature is inherently savage and violent. It was a critical and commercial success and established Golding as a major literary figure. He went on to write many more novels, including "The Inheritors," "Pincher Martin," and "The Spire."

Golding's writing often dealt with themes of morality, the nature of evil, and the darkness within human nature. He believed that civilization is a fragile construct that can easily be destroyed by the inherent violence and savagery of human beings. He also explored the concept of the "other," or the outsider, and the fear and suspicion that often surrounds those who are different.

In addition to his writing, Golding was also a schoolteacher and worked as a lecturer in English literature at both Bishop Wordsworth's School and Hollins College. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1983 for his contributions to the literary world. Golding passed away on June 19, 1993, in Perranarworthal, Cornwall. His legacy as a writer continues to inspire and provoke thought in readers around the world.

Author Information
Characters

CharacterS

Ralph: 

Ralph is the protagonist of "Lord of the Flies" and represents the voice of reason and civilization on the island. He is charismatic and popular, and is elected by the other boys to be their leader. Ralph is determined to maintain order and establish rules for the group, but struggles to assert his authority in the face of the chaos and violence that erupts on the island. He represents the struggle to uphold rationality and morality in a world that has descended into savagery.


Piggy: 

Piggy is a physically weak but intellectually gifted boy who becomes Ralph's closest ally on the island. He is an outcast and is often bullied by the other boys, but provides valuable insights and ideas that help Ralph maintain order. Piggy's glasses, which he uses to start a fire, become a symbol of the boys' civilization and rationality, but are ultimately destroyed in an act of violence. Piggy represents the importance of intelligence and reason in maintaining order and stability.


Jack: 

Jack is the antagonist of "Lord of the Flies" and represents the primal and savage instinct in human nature. He is initially the leader of the boys' choir, and is obsessed with hunting and violence. Jack becomes increasingly authoritarian and violent, and eventually forms his own tribe that competes with Ralph's group for control of the island. Jack represents the dangers of unbridled ambition and unchecked aggression.


Simon: 

Simon is a mysterious and otherworldly boy who is attuned to the natural world on the island. He is quiet and introspective, and often goes off on his own to meditate and observe the island's flora and fauna. Simon has a deep sense of compassion and empathy, and is the only boy who recognizes the true nature of the "beast" that the boys fear. Simon represents the spiritual and compassionate side of human nature, and serves as a contrast to the violent and aggressive behavior of the other boys.


Roger: 

Roger is a sadistic and cruel boy who delights in inflicting pain on others. He is a follower of Jack, and becomes increasingly violent and aggressive as the novel progresses. Roger represents the unchecked and destructive impulse to harm others, and serves as a symbol of the evil that can emerge when human beings are stripped of societal norms and morality.


Sam and Eric: 

Sam and Eric are twin brothers who are loyal followers of Ralph. They are often referred to as "Samneric" and act as a single unit. They are relatively unremarkable characters, but their loyalty and willingness to follow Ralph's leadership represent the importance of camaraderie and cooperation in maintaining order and stability on the island.

Most Important Themes and Concepts

Civilization vs. Savagery

One of the most prominent themes in "Lord of the Flies" is the tension between civilization and savagery, as the boys on the island struggle to establish order and maintain their humanity.

The gradual breakdown of the boys' sense of civilization is conveyed through the deterioration of their physical appearance and behavior, as well as their increasingly violent actions. This is demonstrated through Ralph's observation that "We've got to have rules and obey them. After all, we're not savages. We're English, and the English are best at everything." This use of characterization emphasizes the idea that civilization is something that must be consciously maintained and protected.

Another quote from Simon emphasizes the idea that the boys' descent into savagery is a result of their fear and desire for power: "Maybe there is a beast...maybe it's only us." This use of foreshadowing highlights the idea that the true source of evil is not an external force, but the inherent darkness within human nature.

Finally, the boys' rescue at the end of the novel emphasizes the importance of civilization and the rule of law in maintaining order and preventing chaos: "The officer...smiled at Ralph... 'We saw your smoke. What have you been doing? Having a war or something?'" This use of irony emphasizes the contrast between the boys' primitive state and the civilized world they have been rescued back into.

Loss of Innocence

Another important theme in "Lord of the Flies" is the loss of innocence that the boys experience as they are forced to confront the brutal realities of survival and power.

This theme is conveyed through the gradual transformation of characters such as Jack, who becomes increasingly savage and bloodthirsty as the novel progresses. This is demonstrated through his taunting of Piggy: "You're talking too much...Shut up, Fatty." This use of dialogue emphasizes the idea that power can corrupt even the most innocent and well-intentioned individuals.

Another quote from Simon highlights the idea that the boys' loss of innocence is a result of their own actions, rather than external forces: "What I mean is...maybe it's only us." This use of foreshadowing emphasizes the idea that the true source of evil is not an external force, but the inherent darkness within human nature.

Finally, the novel's conclusion emphasizes the tragic nature of the boys' loss of innocence, as Ralph weeps for the "end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart." This use of symbolism emphasizes the idea that the boys' experiences on the island have permanently damaged their sense of morality and humanity.

Fear

The theme of fear is also central to "Lord of the Flies," as the boys are forced to confront their own fears and insecurities in the face of danger and uncertainty.

This theme is conveyed through the boys' fear of the "beast," which represents the unknown and the primal nature of humanity. This is demonstrated through the boys' reaction to the "beast," as they become increasingly paranoid and violent. This is shown through Ralph's observation that "The trouble is: we don't know if it's really true. We're frightened." This use of dialogue emphasizes the idea that fear can distort perception and lead to irrational behavior.

Another quote from Simon emphasizes the idea that the boys' fear is a result of their own imagination and projection: "Maybe there is a beast...maybe it's only us." This use of irony emphasizes the idea that the true source of fear is not an external force, but the boys' own minds.

Finally, the novel's portrayal of the naval officer at the end of the novel emphasizes the idea that fear is a universal human emotion: "The officer...was looking with interest at a coral reef...Then he shook his head and said, 'I know. Jolly good show. Like the Coral Island.'" This use of characterization emphasizes the idea that even the most civilized and rational individuals are not immune to fear, and that fear is a fundamental aspect of the human condition.

Most Important Quotes,
Literary Techniques and Analysis

"The creature was a party of boys, marching." (Chapter 1)

This quote uses the literary technique of imagery to create a vivid description of the boys' arrival on the island. The quote is significant because it sets the scene for the novel's exploration of human nature and the struggle between civilization and savagery.

"We've got to have rules and obey them. After all, we're not savages." (Chapter 2)

This quote uses the literary technique of foreshadowing to hint at the boys' eventual descent into savagery. The quote is significant because it underscores the novel's theme of the fragility of civilization and the ease with which it can be destroyed.

"The mask was a thing on its own, behind which Jack hid, liberated from shame and self-consciousness."

This quote uses the literary technique of symbolism to represent the boys' descent into savagery and the loss of their inhibitions and sense of morality. The quote is significant because it underscores the novel's theme of the corrupting influence of power and the desire for control.

"I'm frightened. Of us. I want to go home. Oh God, I want to go home." (Chapter 8)

This quote uses the literary technique of symbolism to represent the boys' fear and desperation as they realize the true nature of their situation. The quote is significant because it underscores the novel's theme of the loss of innocence and the destructive power of fear and violence.

"Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart, and the fall through the air of the true, wise friend called Piggy." (Chapter 12)

This quote uses the literary technique of symbolism to represent the complete breakdown of civilization and the triumph of savagery. The quote is significant because it underscores the novel's theme of the inherent darkness of human nature and the struggle between good and evil.

"The thing is - fear can't hurt you any more than a dream." (Chapter 6)

This quote uses the literary technique of metaphor to compare fear to a dream and suggest that fear is not a tangible threat, but rather a product of the imagination. The quote is significant because it underscores the novel's theme of the destructive power of fear and the way it can control and manipulate people's perceptions of reality. It also highlights the contrast between Simon's rational and compassionate worldview and the violent and irrational mindset of the other boys.

Themes and Concepts
Quotes and Techniques

Practice EssaY Questions

Discuss the theme of civilization vs. savagery in the novel, and how it is portrayed through the characters and their actions.


How does the novel explore the concept of power, and how do the different characters exercise and respond to power?


Analyze the role of fear in the novel, and how it affects the behavior and relationships of the characters.


Discuss the symbolism of the conch shell in the novel, and how it represents the themes of order, authority, and communication.


How does the novel explore the relationship between violence and innocence, and what commentary does it offer on the nature of human aggression?


Analyze the role of leadership in the novel, and how the different leaders (Ralph, Jack, and Piggy) embody different approaches to governance and decision-making.


Discuss the theme of social identity in the novel, and how it is shaped by factors such as age, gender, and social status.


How does the novel depict the conflict between individualism and community, and what effect does this have on the characters and their interactions?

Practice Essay Questions

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQS)

What is the plot of "Lord of the Flies"?

"Lord of the Flies" is a novel about a group of British schoolboys who are stranded on a deserted island after a plane crash. As they struggle to survive and find a way to be rescued, the boys' civilization begins to break down and they descend into savagery. The novel explores themes of power, fear, and human nature.


Who are the main characters in "Lord of the Flies"?

The main characters in the novel include Ralph, Piggy, Jack, Simon, and Roger, who are all stranded on the island and struggle to survive.


What is the symbolism of the "beast" in the novel?

The "beast" is a symbol of the boys' fear and the evil that lies within them. As the boys become more savage, their fear of the "beast" grows stronger and it begins to take on a life of its own.


What is the significance of the conch shell in the novel?

The conch shell is a symbol of order and democracy on the island. When Ralph blows the conch, the boys are drawn to it and are able to hold meetings and make decisions as a group. However, as the boys become more savage, the conch loses its power and is eventually destroyed.


What are some themes in "Lord of the Flies"?

Some themes in the novel include the loss of innocence, the corrupting influence of power, the struggle between civilization and savagery, and the inherent evil within human nature.


What is the role of the character Jack in the novel?

Jack is a central character in the novel, and represents the descent into savagery and the corrupting influence of power. He becomes the leader of a group of boys who hunt and kill animals for food, and eventually turns on Ralph and his followers.


What is the significance of the title "Lord of the Flies"?

The title "Lord of the Flies" is a reference to the character of the "Lord of the Flies," a pig's head on a stick that is worshipped by some of the boys as a symbol of power and evil. The title suggests that the novel is a commentary on the corrupting influence of power and the inherent evil within human nature.


What is the historical context of "Lord of the Flies"?

The novel was published in 1954, in the aftermath of World War II and during the Cold War. The novel reflects the anxieties of the time and is often seen as a commentary on the dangers of totalitarianism and the potential for violence and savagery in society.

FAQs

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